Mi'k Maq News of Bay St George

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Indian Found Alive on West Coast

Actually Indians been alive and living on the West Coast, South Coast and central part of the province for quite some time, in fact for centuries. In Bay St. George alone you may know them as Benoit, Bennett, White, Gabriel, Young, Alexander, Doucet, Gaudon, Cormier, Marche, Gallant and many others too numerous to mention here. But, if theyíve been here all the time, why hasnít there been much said of them, with the exception of Conne River the only Federal Indian reserve in the province? Looking back over time, it was most likely because of their own fear and threat of rejection from the non-natives who began to settle here in the mid-1800ís, that they have maintained a low profile ever since. While that fear may not prevail to the same extent today, I wonder if part of the reason might have been the gradual lowering of the self-esteem of these aboriginal people as they were assimilated into the growing non-native population. What were the contributing factors? Government estimates indicate that almost 6,000 people presently classify themselves as aboriginal on the West Coast. That number would significantly increase if those of native ancestry were to seek band-registration for themselves and their families. Being aboriginal is not about blood quantity as the government leads us to believe. Itís about citizenship. If the criteria for being a Newfoundlander was blood quantity and the government declared in order to receive government benefits, one had to prove through documented evidence that he or she was 50% British, 30% Irish, and 20% Scotch, how many would qualify? I for one would not.

First, letís take a look at how the Miíkmaq arrived here in the first place. Quite frankly, I donít know, and I doubt that anyone else knows either. That being the case, how can anyone argue that the Miíkmaq were not here before the Europeans? Those of us who grew-up in Newfoundland, learned school text books written by English writers who naturally presented everything in the British tradition, and not all of it was factual as later recorded history has proven but, these writings came to be accepted as fact by succeeding generations. On the other hand, Mikímaq oral tradition holds that the Miíkmaq people have continuously occupied these lands since prehistoric times and that this original population was later joined by a group from Cape Breton. That may or may not be true, but there are references in English and French historical records indicating that Miíkmaq from Cape Breton hunted, fished and trapped here between the south coast and Placentia Bay on a seasonal basis during the early 1600ís.

Together with the Beothuk, the Miíkmaq or Micmac as they have become known, were probably the first Native North Americans to have regular contact with Europeans. This may have occurred as early as the eleventh century with the early Viking settlements off the coast of North America or perhaps with the Basque fishermen who visited the Grand Banks before John Cabotís voyage in 1497. This was probably kept quiet because they wanted to catch all of the fish for themselves. There are some writings that indicate John Cabot took back three Micmacs with him when he returned to England from his first voyage. It is also interesting to note that the early Europeans used Micmac guides to lead them into the interior of the province. If the Europeans had been here first, would they not have guided others? By the early 1500ís, Basque, Spanish, French, British and Irish fishing boats were coming to fish off Newfoundland and by 1520 they were coming ashore. Thatís how trade began with the Micmac people, mainly for furs. The fishermen found the Micmac very friendly and eager to trade. The Miíkmaq language is a member of the Algonkin family and is related to the language of the Malecite, the Passamaquoddy, the Innu, and even the Beothuk. Some of the burial customs of the Miíkmaq and Beothuk are also similar. The Miíkmaq, at one time, were the predominant tribe in the Maritime region, the area we now call the Atlantic provinces.

Another influx of people of Micmac ancestry occurred on the West coast primarily in the Bay St. George region, during the 1840ís. These people came mostly from the Margaree, Cheticamp and Braídor regions of Cape Breton and the majority of todayís inhabitants of Bay St. George are direct descendents of these same people. Itís really not hard to understand why the culture and language was lost as time passed. I believe there are three main reasons for this. Firstly, as more and more ships visited Bay St. George, Europeans and others began to settle here in greater numbers and this settlement pushed the Indian people further away from the shores and rivers which had so abundantly produced sea animals, salmon, trout and eels. Also, the Micmac people were traditionally hunters and gatherers and spent much time in the country chasing caribou and trapping for furs. Because they were gone so much of the time, they were an easy people to dislodge from their settlements of which Stephenville and Flat Bay were major camps. Secondly, the Bay St. George area had been a French possession until 1904 when it was turned over to the English. The Micmac had always been friendly with the French and there was significant inter-marrying with the French throughout Eastern Canada. Itís little wonder that many Micmac and French/Micmac in Bay St. George may have been reluctant to declare they were Indian on census records including the 1921 nominal census and those conducted later on. The third factor, and of no less importance, was the establishment of the Christian churches in the region. Most of the priests who came here were Irish, and one of the first things children learned in school was that only the English language was to be used and nothing else. As the region developed economically, there was further erosion of French and Micmac language and culture. With the establishment of the large American air base in Stephenville, this erosion actually accelerated.

There is a huge difference between integration and assimilation. Integration happens when a people of different ethnic or racial background adjusts and adapts to a different cultural environment than their own yet, retains their language, cultural values and customs. For example, look at any Chinese family living here, they have, for the most part, completely integrated into the local environment yet, the whole family including children, all speak Chinese. However, where the language and culture disappears, as in the case of the Acadian and Micmac people of Western Newfoundland, they have been assimilated into the prevailing way of life. For the most part yes, but thatís not completely the case. In Bay St. George alone, there are four Indian bands, which have retained separate and distinct identities over the years. These are Stephenville/Stephenville Crossing Indian Band, Port au Port Indian Band, St. Georgeís Indian Band and Flat Bay Indian Band. There are other bands on the West coast including Corner Brook and Benoitís Cove. These bands are all affiliated with the Federation of Newfoundland Indians (FNI). Throughout western and central Newfoundland there are a total of ten Indian bands affiliated with the FNI.

Closer to home, my own home in fact, nobody ever spoke of our Indian ancestry when I was growing-up, at least not when I was present. Thatís because nobody spoke about Indian ancestry to my parents either. It wasnít until I began extensive research into my own family lines did I discover that each of my four grandparents were of Micmac and French descent. It was a revelation for me and it has become not only a passion, but somewhat of an obsession as I learn more of the ways and customs of my ancestors. Itís like discovering a part of you that you really didnít know you had, but all of a sudden itís there and itís special. It has rekindled a whole new interest in my family including my own children who now want to learn and pass this same knowledge on to their own children. Itís exciting to have discovered, only in the past few years that a relief for burns my grandmother once used was in fact an old Indian remedy that had been handed down through generations in my family. More and more information of this nature is being revealed and so it should. It was also most interesting to discover that my wife (Aucoin) has a strong Micmac ancestry as well.

Bay St. George, in particular, is often depicted incorrectly and therefore itís perceived incorrectly as well. For example, job positions offered by a large employer recently advertised in the Western Star categorized Bay St. George as a unique blend of English, Scottish and French. Thatís not really true. A more correct representation would be French/Micmac, English and Scottish. Many Micmac throughout the Maritime region of Canada adopted French names and some of these names prevail in Bay St. George and other places on the West coast of the province.If you drive through Nova Scotia or New Brunswick or Prince Edward Island you will probably see a Micmac craft shop or some evidence of the presence of the Micmac culture in the area. Why should Bay St. George and other West Coast centers not have the same presence? Perhaps the time has come to develop a greater awareness of the rich Indian heritage that is representative of such a large segment of the people of this region. There should be language and cultural training offered locally to anyone wishing to learn the language and the rich heritage of its people. Would not an Acadian/Micmac museum be a great testimony to our colorful past and would it not be a great tourist attraction?

I get excited when I find an old picture of a great-great grandmother or great-great grandfather and show it to my parents and see the expression of joy on their faces as they view an actual photo of a distant relative they often heard talked about but had never seen. Wouldnít you feel the same way? My parents will shortly become members of one of the local Indian bands and I look forward to sharing some of our lost culture with them, just as we did at the mini-pow wow held in Corner Brook last summer. Those of us who are of aboriginal ancestry need not take a back seat to anyone for any reason. Our people may have been put-down by governments and churches in the past, but there is no reason to be put down today. For centuries the aboriginal people throughout Canada have fought to preserve the land, while others have fought to destroy it. Just look at the forest devastation in our own province. I hear the words of Frank Russell, a fellow band member who recently wrote these words in the Western Star, ďItís too late after Mother Earth has been poisoned that man will come to realize that money can't be eaten." Well said Frank! We should all be proud of whatever ancestry we might possess. And, if you listen carefully, you might just hear the drum that beats for you. May the strong winds blow gently at your back!

Bert Alexander

Copyright © 2001 Bert Alexander

Community Editorial Board

Stephenville, NF

November 13, 2001


In Rememberance:

OBITUARY: MARCHE Emily Mary, Red Brook

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Emily Mary Marche announce her passing at the Western Memorial Regional Hospital in Corner Brook on Saturday March 2, 2002 at the age of 69 years. She will be sadly missed by her loving husband, Howard and three sons: Roy (Barb) Marche of Red Brook, Alexander Marche and Lloyd Marche, both of Calgary; six daughters: Joanne (Claude) LePage of Abraham's Cove, Norma Marche, Jerona Hewitt, Esmerilda Hogan, all of Calgary, Sylvia (Mike) Smith of Arizona, Nancy (Mike) Woods of Calgary; six brothers: Paul Benoit, Sylvester Benoit, Leonard Benoit, Hilary Benoit, Conrad Benoit, Aiden Benoit; four sisters: Leona Chaisson, Rose Young, Yvonne Benoit, Mary Robia and twelve grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and a large circle of relatives and friends. She was predeceased by her parents, John Alfred Benoit and Millicent Eunice (Chaisson) Benoit and her brother, Lodvick Benoit. Friends may call at Our Lady of the Cape Parish, Cape St. George on Monday, March 4. Funeral services will take place on Tuesday March 5 at 10:30 a.m. from Our Lady of the Cape Parish, Cape St. George with interment in the Roman Catholic Cemetery in Marches Point. As expressions of sympathy, in lieu of flowers, donations to the Kidney Foundation would be greatly appreciated. Funeral arrangements are under the supervision of Russell's Funeral Home, 39 Queen Street, Stephenville.


OBITUARY: JOHN EARNEST BENOIT, JR.

Benoit, John Earnest -68, Eastern Passage, died January 8, 2002 in Dartmouth General Hospital. Born in Marches Point, Port au Port, Newfoundland he was a son of the late John and Clara (Simon) Benoit. He was a professional carpenter and a member of the Carpenters Union. He was employed with Lindsay Construction for many years and worked on many large projects around Nova Scotia. He is survived by his wife, the former Carol Hobin; children: Shelley, Kirn (Dave) Eldershaw, both of Eastern Passage; his former wife Adeline Benoit, Marches Point, NF; children: Roy (Leita), Marches Point, NF; Max (Norma), Oakville, ON; Wade (Chantal), Oakville, ON; Gary (Yvonne), Marches Point, ON;Marc (Joanne), Dartmouth, NS; Kenneth, Dartmouth, NS; Judy (Donald)Young, Marches Point, NF; Jackie Benoit (Wayne), Coldbrook, NS; Roxanne (Earl), Port aux Basques, NP; child: Michelle(Sean) Feltham, ON; 27 grandchildren; four sisters Margaret, Annie May, Bertha, Madonna; and two brothers Bernard and Patrick. He was predeceased by daughter Debra as well as several brothers and sisters, Visiting was from 7-9 p.m. Thursday in Eastern Passage Community Funeral Home, 5 Cow Bay Rd. Funeral was held 9 a.m. Friday in St. Andrew's Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Passage, Rev. Thomas Thekkekara officiating. Burial followed in St. Andrew's Cemetery. Family flowers only be request. In lieu, donations may be made to Heart and Lung Foundation of Nova Scotia.


OBITUARY: VALERIE JESSO, De Grau

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Valerie Jesso announce her passing on December 16, 2001 at the age of 41 years. She will be sadly missed by her loving husband Allan Jesso and her sons, Allan Jesso, Jr, Rocky Jesso, Kirk Jesso and daughter Cathy Campbell. Her sister Corina Benoit, brothers Augustus(Hasel) Benoit, Albert (Cindy) Benoit, Walter (Jean) Benoit, Wilson (Melissa) Benoit, Brian (Laverna) Benoit, Don Benoit and Alvin Benoit. Her parents Donalda and Dulcie Benoit, grandmother Rita Benoit. Her grandchildren and a large circle of relatives and friends. She was predeceased by her grandfather Dominic Benoit. Memorial ceromonies and cremation was officiated by Russell's Funeral Home.


OBITUARY: LAWRENCE YOUNG, Sheaves Cove

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Lawrence Young announce his passing at the Sir Thomas Roddick Hospital in Stephenville on Tuesday, March 26, 2002 at the age of 68 years. He will be sadly missed by his loving wife Annie and five sons: Ivan Young (Tina Jesso) of Marches Point, Jeffrey (Myra) Young of Abraham's Cove, Cletus Young of Kippens, Lawrence Young Jr. of St. John's, Randy Young of Sheaves Cove; two daughters: Riza (Ricky) Tourout of Piccadilly, Nora (Dale) Robinson of Cox's Cove; his mother Mary Cecilia Young of Ship Cove; four brothers: Hector (Geraldine) Young of Sheaves Cove, Michael (Maude) Young of Port au Port, James (Lorraine) Young of Stephenville, Leo Young of Ship Cove; one sister Maisie Jesso of Cape St. George; 16 grandchildren; 2 great-grandchildren and a large circle of relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his father, Anthony Young and his sister, Geraldine Jesso and brother, Wallace Young. Friends may call at St. Joseph's Chapel in Sheaves Cove on Wednesday Funeral service will take place on Thursday, March 28th at 2:00 p.m. from St. Joseph's Chapel in Sheaves Cove with interment in the Roman Catholic Cemetery in Sheaves Cove. Funeral arrangements are under the supervision of Russell's Funeral Home, 39 Queen Street, Stephenville.


OBITUARY: THOMAS BENNETT, Three Rock Cove

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Thomas Bennett announce his passing at the Western Memorial Regional Hospital in Comer Brook on Thursday, March 28th, 2002 at the age of 64 years. He will be-sadly missed by his wife Audrey, his son Jason (Rachel) in Cape St. George and his daughter Clara (Howard) Bennett in Ship Cove. He will also be remembered by his brother Earl (Florence) Bennett in Stephenville Crossing, his three sisters; Catherine Downey and Gladys Swyers both in Stephenville Crossing, Mae Nolan in Ontario, three grandchildren and a large circle of relatives and friends. Friends may call at St. Philomena Church-funeral services will take place on Tuesday, April 2nd, 2002 at 11 a.m. with interment in the Roman Catholic Cemetery in Three Rock Cove. Funeral arrangements are under the supervision of Russell's Funeral Home, 39 Queen St. in Stephenville.


OBITUARY:MARINA MARY DEMPSY,Halifax, N.S. formally from Lower Cove, Nfld

It is with great sadness that the family of Marina Maryy (Jesso) Dempsey announce her peaceful passing on March 20, 2002 at the VG site, Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Halifax, Nova Scotia at the age of 63. Born in Lower Cove, Marina was a wonderful wife, mother, grandmother, sister and friend who will be fondly remembered for her generous nature and zest for life. Predeceased by her parents, John and Caroline Jesso; brother, Wilson (Mildred) and sister Murial (Norman) Young . She will be sadly missed by her husband, Jim Dempsey of Halifax: daughters Judy (Bob) Walter of Gander. Audrey (Martin) Jesso of Degrau, Rose Marie (Zichary) Benoit of Halifax, Evelyn Levy of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, Lisa (Adam) Jesso of Saint John, New Brunswick and Annette of Halifax; son, Melvin (Sherry) of Lower Cove; brother, Roderick (Laverne) Jesso of Lower Cove; sisters Evelyn (Rod) of Lower Cove, grandchildren Cora Lyne, Rudy, Drew, Martin, Trina, Shaun, Andrew, Nolan, Evan, Desiree, Jenna and Michelle as well as a number of neices, nephews and cousins, plus a large circle of friends. Cremation occurred on March 23, 2002, with some of her ashes being laid to rest at Oakridge Memory Gardens in Sackvillc, Nova Scotia and the remainder at the Roman Catholic cemetery in Lower Cove. A memorial service in her honour was held at Our Lady of Fatuna Church in Piccadilly on March 28.


OBITUARY: SONNY LAINEY, Mainland, Nfld

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Sonny Lainey announce his passing at his residence in Mainland on Friday. April 5, 2002 at the age of 43 years. He will be sadly missed by his wife, Rubina and his daughter, Samantha Lainey of Mainland; his mother, Genevieve Lainey of Mainland; three brothers: Lester (Pauline) Lainey of Mainland, Alcid (Pauline) Lainey of Mainland, Cyril (Gail) Lainey of Halifax, Nova Scotia; five sisters: Emiline Gale of Nottawa, Ontario, Eileen (Ricky) Moraze of Guelph, Ontario, Joanne Lainey (Mark Benoit) of Halifax, Nova Scotia, Zita (Felix) Hinks of Mainland, Renalda Lainey (Gary Chaisson) of Brampton, Ontario and a large circle of nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his father, Anatole Lainey. Funeral Services took place on Monday, April 8th at 10:30 a.m. from St. Anne's Chapel in Mainland with Interment in the Roman Catholic Cemetery in Mainland. Funeral Arrangements were made under the supervision of Russell's Funeral Home, 39 Queen Street, Stephenville.


OBITUARY: PATRICK JOSEPH CHAISSON, Mainland, Nfld

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Patrick Joseph Chaisson of Lourdes announce his passing at the Sir Thomas Roddick Hospital in Stephenville on Thursday, June 24th at the age of 61 years. He will be sadly missed by his loving wife, Rose and two sons: Glen in Halifax, Nova Scotia and Sheldon in Kitchener, Ontario and three daughters: Denise (John) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Melissa and Monique, both in Lourdes and seven brothers: Adolph (Muriel), Mike (Genevieve), Charlie (Mercedes), Harry (Vita), all in Mainland, Fred (Eva) in Stephenville Crossing, Amos (Genevieve) in Kippens, Frank (Kay) in Halifax, Nova Scotia and four sisters: Genevieve Benoit in Stephenville, Margaret (William) Dubie, Gladys (Murdock) Barter, all in Mainland, Eleanor (Chesley) White in Halifax, Nova Scotia and two granddaughters: Desiree Chaisson and Felicia Chaisson, both in Halifax, Nova Scotia and a large circle of nieces, nephews, relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his parents, Narcis and Mary Ann Chaisson. . Funeral services took place on Saturday, June 26th at 10:30 a.m. from Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Lourdes with interment in the Roman Catholic Cemetery in West Bay.

OBITUARY: ANGELA BENOIT, Lourdes, Nfld

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Angela Benoit announce her passing at her residence in Lourdes on Thursday, June 3, 1999 at the age of 51 years. She will be sadly missed by her two daughters: Ashley Benoit and Lisa (Roger) Young, all in Prince Edward Island; and six brothers: Archie (Bridget) in Lourdes, Clarence in Lourdes, Philip (Marie) in Yukon, Derry (Mary), Brad (Maggie) and James, all in Lourdes; and three sisters: Ursula (Dr. Bernard) Murray in Corner Brook, Alma (William) Drover in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Alice Clarke in Ontario; and two grandsons: Kyle Benoit and Mitchelle Young. She will also be sadly missed by a large circle of relatives and friends. She was predeceased by her parents, Lawrence and Dorothy Benoit. Funeral services took place on Monday, June 7th at 10:30 a.m. from Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Lourdes with interment in the Roman Catholic Cemetery in Three Rock Cove.


OBITUARY: LAWRENCE BENOIT, Lourdes, Nfld

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Lawrence Benoit of Lourdes announce his passing at Sir Thomas Roddick Hospital in Stephenville on Sunday, May 16, 1999 at the age of 85 years. He will be sadly missed by six sons: Archie (Bridget) Benoit in Lourdes, Clarence J. Benoit in Winterhouses, Philip (Maria) Benoit in Yukon, Brad (Maggie) Benoit in Lourdes, Derry (Mary) Benoit in Winterhouses, James Benoit in Lourdes and four daughters: Ursula (Bernard) Murray in Corner Brook, Angela Benoit in Lourdes, Alma (Bill) Drover in Alberta, Alice Clarke in Ontario, 33 grandchildren, 42 great grandchildren and 7 great-great grandchildren and a large circle of relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his wife, Dorothy Benoit on February 2, 1999. Friends may call at Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Lourdes on Tuesday (starting at 2:00 p.m.) and Wednesday. Funeral services took place on Thursday, May 20th at 10:30 a.m. from Our Lady of Lourdes Parish in Lourdes with interment in the Roman Catholic Cemetery in Three Rock Cove.


OBITUARY: WALLACE MARCHE, Piccadilly, Nfld

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Wallace Marche announce his passing on Thursday, October 28th, 1999 at Sir Thomas Roddick Hospital, Stephenville at the age of 71 years. Leaving to mourn with fond and loving memories, his wife Zetha; eight sons: Wilfred (Rita), Roddy, Morris (Fay), all of Piccadilly; Hillary (Linda), West Bay; Ken, Toronto; Wallace, Jr. and Gerard of Halifax, NS; Dennis (Patsy), Mainland; seven daughters: Mercedes (Dave), Rona (Pat), Rita (Richard), Sheila (Neil), Tracy (Chris), all of Piccadilly; Susan (Gerald), PEI; Joselyn (Darell), Toronto; 26 grandchildren, three great-grandchildren; one brother : Howard (Emily) Marche, Red Brook; three sisters: Mary Jesso, Toronto; Maggie Rubia and Jeneive Young, both of Red Brook; and a large circle of nieces, nephews, other relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his sons, Jervis and Kevin; brothers, Edward and Albert; sisters: Angela, Ethel, Lena, Josephine, Rita and Annie. The family will be receiving friends from Our Lady of Fatima Roman Catholic Church in Piccadilly beginning Friday at 10:00 a.m. from where the funeral service took place on Saturday, October 30th at 2:00 p.m. with Father Patrey officiating. Interment will follow at the church cemetery.

Friday, October 29, 1999, edition of The Western Star


OBITUARY:MILDRED ELIZABETH YOUNG, Lourdes, Nfld

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Mildred Elizabeth Young of Lourdes announce her passing at the Sir Thomas Roddick Hospital in Stephenville on Saturday, November 13, 1999 at the age of 65 years. She will be sadly missed by two sons: Henry Joseph Jesso in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Jerry (Surena) Jesso in Oshawa, Ontario and four daughters: Anna Bensette, Marjorie (Bernard) Benoit, all in Marches Point, Elaine Melanson in Keswick, Ontario, Diane (Chris) Galagher in Oshawa, Ontario and five brothers: Harold (Rose) Young in Black Duck Siding, Martin Young in Prince Edward Island, Bernie Young, Gervis (Ann) Young, all in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Finty Young in Black Duck Siding and three sisters: Viola (Martin) Lucas, Dulsie (Tommy) Downey, all in Stephenville Crossing, Mena Lucas in Lourdes and 9 grandchildren, 2 great-grandchildren and a large circle of relatives and friends. Cremation Service will take place on Wednesday.

Monday, November 15, 1999, edition of The Western Star


OBITUARY:ALPHONSUS WHITE, West Bay, Nfld

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Alphonsus White announce his passing at his residence in West Bay Center on Saturday, November 27, 1999 at the age of 73 years. He will be sadly missed by his loving wife, Marina and three sons: Sandy (Ginnette) in Timmins, Ontario, Al (Adeline) and Pat, all in West Bay Center and two daughters: Tina Ryan in Trout River, Edie White in Brampton, Ontario and two brothers: James (Marion) in West Bay Center, Raymond (Elwidge) in Georgetown, Prince Edward Island and five sisters: Bernadette Dollard, Theresa McHugh, both in Stephenville, Jean White in Amherst, Nova Scotia, Pauline Mullins in Bellville, Illinois, Florence (Martin) Young, in Stephenville and ten grandchildren and a large circle of relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his parents, John and Annie White. Funeral services took place on Tuesday, November 30, 1999 at 10:30 a.m. from Our Lady of Lourdes Church in Lourdes with interment in the Roman Catholic Cemetery in West Bay.

Monday, November 29, 1999, edition of The Western Star.


OBITUARY: DANIEL BENOIT, Piccadilly, Nfld

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Daniel Benoit of Piccadilly announce his passing at the Sir Thomas Roddick Hospital in Stephenville on Wednesday, December 22, 1999 at the age of 48 years. He will be sadly missed by his loving wife, Philomena and one son, Daniel Benoit in Georgetown, Ontario and one daughter, Sherry Benoit in Stephenville and five brothers: Charlie, Thomas, Allen, all in Piccadilly, Cecil and Bernie, both in Kitchener, Ontario and ten sisters: Zita, Leona, Rona, Judy, Jenny, Kathleen, all in Kitchener, Ontario, Veronica in Yellowknife, Masie in Virginia, Patsy in Alabama, Lillian in Georgia; a large circle of relatives and friends. Friends may call at Russell's Funeral Home, 39 Queen Street in Stephenville on Friday and Saturday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral services took place on Sunday, December 26th at 10:00 a.m. from the Kingdom Hall of the Jehovah Witness on the Hansen Highway with interment in the Jehovah Witness Cemetery in Pasadena.

Friday, December 24, 1999, edition of The Western Star.


OBITUARY: CHARLES BENNETT, Kippens, Nfld

It is with great sadness that the family of the late Charles A. Bennett announce his passing at the Bay St. George Long Term Care Center on Tuesday, August 3rd, 1999, at the age of 86 years. He will be sadly missed by his loving wife Magdalen, nee Gaudon, his four sons: Bryan (Melina) in Port au Port, Percy (Loretta) in Avondale, Calvin (Judy) in Dartmouth, NS and Gerard (Mary) in Bradford, ON, his two daughters: Rona (Kenneth) Home in Readfield, M.E., and Bernadette (David) Smith in Brantford, ON. He also leaves to mourn three sisters: Cecilia (Robert F.) Westfall in Kansas, Missouri, Rita (Elmer) Smith in Virginia and Veronica Mullin in Whitby, ON, 17 grandchildren, four great grandchildren and a large circle of relatives and friends. He was predeceased by his son Earl in 1963. He was also predeceased by his brothers: Michael, Cornelius, Harry, Aloysuis, Arnold and by his sisters: Eileen, Helen and Teresa. Funeral services took place on Thursday, August 5th, 1999 at 10:00 a.m. from St. Stephen's Parish on West Street with interment in the R.C. Cemetery on West Street.


OBITUARY: JOHANNA CORNECT, Mainland, Port au Port, NF

It is with great sadness that the family of the ate Johanna Cornect ( nee Lainey ) announce her passing at Sir Thomas Roddick Hospital on Monday,May 13,2002 at the age of 88. She leaves to mourn with fond and loving memories her two daughters: Mabel Bungay, Lourdes and Margaret Cornect, Mainland; Eight sons: John (Philomena), Ronald (Leona), Kevin (Sylvia), Adolph (Marjorie), William (Mabel), Clyde and Vincent, all of Mainland, Leonard in Ottawa; 32 grandchildren, 16 great grandchildren. She is predeceased by her husband William Cornect in 1989 and by her daughter Delma in 1997. The funeral service took place at St. Anne's Chapel in Mainland, Port Au Port on Wednesday, May 15 at 10:00 a.m. Father Lee Lainey officiated. Interment followed at the church cemetery.


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